Tuesday, July 09, 2013

Important Information for Kenai River Dipnetters

Kenai River Personal Use Dipnet Fishery Opens July 10, 2013

Retention of King Salmon is Prohibited

Also please see below for information on elevated levels of bacteria found on Kenai River beaches and precautions you should take to avoid exposure

The Kenai River personal use dipnet fishery will open July 10 and continue through July 31. Retention of king salmon in the Kenai River personal use fishery will be prohibited in 2013. Any king salmon caught may not be removed from the water and must be released immediately unharmed.

Based upon the preseason forecast, the 2013 Kenai River king salmon run is expected to be below average. Based upon the poor performance of king salmon stocks in Cook Inlet and other areas of the state, it is likely the Kenai River late-run king salmon stock will also experience poor performance. The 2013 late-run king salmon sport fishery was restricted from using bait in the Kenai River. Initial indicators of Kenai River late-run strength are below average, with a cumulative DIDSON sonar count of 694 king salmon through July 4, and poor catch rates in both the east-side set net commercial and inriver sport fisheries over the holiday weekend. Therefore, as directed by the Kenai River Late-Run King Salmon Management Plan, the personal use fishery will be managed to conserve king salmon in an effort to avoid additional restrictions or closure to the sport fishery. 
Based on the preseason forecast, the 2013 sockeye salmon run to the Kenai River is expected to be above average. The personal use fishery will be open from 6:00 a.m. to 11:00 p.m. each day, from July 10 through July 31. A permit is required to participate; permits and regulations that apply to the fishery are available at local vendors and ADF&G offices.
For information on Kenai River king salmon visit our website at:http://www.adfg.alaska.gov/sf/FishCounts/index.cfm?ADFG=main.home.

Alaska Department of Environmental Conservation Press Release

Elevated levels of bacteria found at Kenai River beaches
Enterococci and Fecal coliform bacteria could pose health threat

(KENAI, AK) – Recent water quality samples collected at Kenai River Beaches 
indicate elevated levels of enterococci and fecal coliform bacteria in the water. 
The Alaska Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) is collecting 
samples this summer to determine if the water is safe for recreation. 

Contact with water that has high levels of enterococci/fecal coliform bacteria 
may cause people to have stomach aches, diarrhea, or ear, eye and skin 
infections. 

DEC suggests that beach users take normal precautions to avoid exposure, 
such as avoiding drinking or swimming in the water, washing after contact 
with the water, and rinsing fish harvested from the area with clean water. As 
always, people should cook seafood to a minimum of 145 degrees Fahrenheit 
internal temperature to destroy pathogens.

Read the full press release HERE



Friday, May 10, 2013

Kenai River to go Catch & Release only for King Salmon

Emergency Order by Alaska Department of Fish & Game


Beginning May 16, 2013 the retention of king salmon 20 inches or greater in length, but less than 55 inches, while sportfishing on the Kenai River, is prohibited.


Emergency Order No. 2-KS-1-11-13 Issued at Soldotna: Thursday, May 9, 2013

Effective Date: 12:01 a.m., Thursday, May 16, 2013

Expiration Date: 11:59 p.m., Sunday, July 14, 2013, unless superseded by subsequent emergency order.

EXPLANATION:
This emergency order prohibits the retention of king salmon 20 inches or greater in length, but less than 55 inches in length, while sport fishing in waters of the Kenai River drainage downstream of Skilak Lake and in the Moose River from its confluence with the Kenai River upstream to the northernmost edge of the Sterling Highway bridge beginning at 12:01 a.m., Thursday, May 16, through 11:59 p.m., Sunday, June 30, 2013.

Harvest is allowed for king salmon less than 20 inches in length and 55 inches or greater in length. In addition, this emergency order prohibits the use of bait and prohibits the retention of king salmon 20 inches or greater in length, but less than 55 inches in length, while sport fishing in waters of the Kenai River drainage from an ADF&G regulatory marker located approximately 300 yards downstream from the mouth of Slikok Creek, upstream to the outlet of Skilak Lake, and in the Moose River from its confluence with the Kenai River upstream to the northernmost edge of the Sterling Highway Bridge, beginning 12:01 a.m., Monday, July 1, through 11:59 p.m., Sunday, July 14, 2013. Harvest is allowed for king salmon less than 20 inches in length and 55 inches or greater in length.

In the waters described above, only one unbaited, single-hook, artificial lure may be used. King salmon 20 inches or greater in length but less than 55 inches in length may not be retained or possessed, may not be removed from the water, and must be released immediately.

Wednesday, April 24, 2013

Attention: New King Salmon Fishing Restrictions Beginning May 1st, 2013

The Alaska Department of Fish & Game has issued new KING SALMON FISHING RESTRICTIONS for the Kenai Peninsula and Valley streams, over concerns of continued below-average runs.

Read articles about the new restrictions HERE and HERE

Below is the list of restrictions that begin May 1st, 2013 in lower Cook Inlet and the Kenai Peninsula:


Bag and possession limit for king salmon in the Ninilchik River is reduced to one king salmon beginning Wednesday, May 1, 2013 through Sunday, June 30, 2013. Contact: Carol Kerkvliet

Bag and possession limit for king salmon in the Kasilof River is reduced to one hatchery-produced king salmon beginning Wednesday, May 1, 2013 through Sunday, June 30, 2013. Contact:Robert Begich

Only one unbaited, single-hook, artificial lure will be allowed while sport fishing in the Anchor River, Deep Creek and Ninilchik River beginning Wednesday, May 1, 2013, at 12:01 a.m. through 11:59 p.m., Sunday, June 30, 2013. Contact: Carol Kerkvliet

Annual limit for Anchor River, Deep Creek, Ninilchik River, and a portion of marine waters reduced to a combined annual limit of 2 king salmon beginning May 1. Contact: Carol Kerkvliet

The Anchor River will not open to sport fishing on Wednesdays, as stated in the 2013 Southcentral Alaska Sport Fishing Regulation Summary booklet. In addition, the ADF&G regulatory marker will be relocated downstream. Contact: Carol Kerkvliet

Below is the list of restrictions beginning May 15th, 2013 in Northern Cook Inlet streams:


Susitna River king salmon fisheries (Units 1-6) are restricted beginning Tuesday, May 15, through Friday, July 13. Contact: Sam Ivey

This emergency order limits sport fishing gear to one unbaited, single-hook, artificial lure only when fishing in the Susitna River drainage. In addition, a person, after taking a king salmon 20 inches or greater in length, may not fish for any species of finfish on the same day in any waters open to sport fishing for king salmon in the Susitna River Drainage Area

This emergency order also prohibits the harvest of king salmon (any size) in Units 1 (except Deshka River) 2, 3, 5, and 6 of the Susitna River. Where harvest is prohibited, catch-and-release fishing is allowed. In the waters of Unit 2 open to king salmon fishing, fishing for trout and other species is not affected and is allowed as written in current regulation. The Deshka River is open to harvest of king salmon seven day per week; however, only one unbaited, single hook, artificial lure is allowed.

Within Unit 4 (Yentna drainage), except for the Talachulitna River, this emergency order allows harvest to occur each Friday, Saturday, Sunday, and Monday and prohibits the retention of king salmon (any size) each Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday. On Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Thursdays, catch-and-release fishing is allowed, king salmon may not be retained or possessed, and king salmon caught may not be removed from the water and must be released immediately. The Talachulitna River is catch-and-release only seven days per week.

This emergency order is effective from 6:00 a.m., Wednesday, May 15, 2013, through 11:59 p.m., Saturday, July 13, 2013.

Annual limit for Susitna River drainage and Little Susitna River reduced to a combined annual limit of 2 king salmon beginning May 15. Contact: Sam Ivey

The Little Susitna River king salmon fishery is restricted beginning Tuesday, May 15, through Friday, July 13. Contact: Sam Ivey

This emergency order limits sport fishing gear to one unbaited, single-hook, artificial lure only when fishing in the Little Susitna River drainage. A single-hook is defined as a hook with only one point. In addition, this emergency order prohibits the retention of king salmon (any size) each Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, and Friday beginning Wednesday, May 15, 2013. Catch-and-release fishing is allowed, but king salmon may not be retained or possessed Tuesday–Friday; king salmon caught may not be removed from the water and must be released immediately. King salmon may be retained on each Saturday, Sunday, and Monday in the Little Susitna River.

This emergency order is effective from 6:00 a.m., Wednesday, May 15, 2013, through 11:59 p.m., Saturday, July 13, 2013. The area affected by this emergency order includes all waters open to king salmon fishing within the Little Susitna River drainage from its mouth upstream to the Parks Highway.

Tuesday, April 16, 2013

ADF&G Announces 2013 Southeast Alaska Chinook Salmon Harvest Quota

Press Release: April 4, 2013
Contact: Pattie Skannes (907) 747-6688

2013 SOUTHEAST ALASKA CHINOOK SALMON QUOTA

The Alaska Department of Fish and Game announced today that under Chinook salmon management provisions of the Pacific Salmon Treaty (PST), the 2013 abundance index (AI) for Southeast Alaska has been calculated to be 1.20, which results in an all-gear harvest quota of 176,000 treaty Chinook salmon. This all-gear abundance-based quota represents a decrease of 90,800 fish when compared with last year’s preseason estimate of 266,800 fish at an AI of 1.52. The commercial troll fishery preseason Chinook salmon harvest allocation for 2013 is 129,862 fish, a decrease of 67,410 Chinook when compared with last year’s troll allocation of 197,272 fish.

The all-gear Chinook salmon quota is allocated among commercial and sport fisheries according to management plans established in regulation by the Alaska Board of Fisheries [5 AAC 29.060(b) and 47. 055]. Most Chinook salmon produced from Alaska hatcheries are not factored into the AI and may be harvested in addition to the treaty limit.

Read the full press release HERE