Wednesday, December 27, 2006

Upper Kenai, Kasilof Waters Affected by FSB Proposals

The Federal Subsistence Board has published proposals for changes to regulations that will affect sport fishermen on the Kenai Peninsula. There are proposals for subsistence gillnet, dipnet, and rod and reel harvests of salmon, rainbow trout, Dolly Varden, lake trout, etc. The comment deadline is January 5.

Read the proposal packet >>>

Friday, December 22, 2006

Fed Subsistence Board to Meet Jan 9-11

From a USFS News Release

The Federal Subsistence Board will meet Jan. 9-11 from 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily at the Egan Civic and Convention Center, 555 W. 5th Ave., Anchorage. The meeting may conclude early, depending upon when the Board completes its work.

The Board will consider proposals to change Federal subsistence fisheries regulations for the 2007-2008 regulatory year. In addition, the Board will consider funding for subsistence-related research and monitoring projects for 2007 under the Fisheries Resource Monitoring Program.

The Board will consider proposals for Southeast Alaska, Bristol Bay and the Copper River. Proposals to change Federal subsistence fishery regulations on the Kenai Peninsula will be considered when the Board meets in May 2007.

The public is welcome at this meeting. Meeting materials can be found on the Federal Subsistence Management Program website, http://alaska.fws.gov/asm/home.html, under Federal Subsistence Board - Meeting Materials. Questions about the meeting agenda or requests for reasonable accommodations should be directed to Larry Buklis at (800) 478-1456 or (907) 786-3822 or by e-mail, Larry_Buklis@fws.gov.

Monday, December 18, 2006

Becoming an Outdoors Woman - Late March

From an ADFG News Release

The Alaska Department of Fish and Game will host a “Becoming an Outdoors-Woman" workshop on March 24, 25 and 26, 2006, at Victory Bible Camp near Palmer.

“Becoming an Outdoors-Woman” is an international program designed to introduce people to hunting, fishing, and other outdoor activities. Over 40 hands-on sessions are scheduled, including firearm safety, bear safety, bow hunting, trapping, field dressing of fish and game, ice fishing, salmon fishing, fly tying, dog mushing, snow machining, chain saw safety, canning and smoking, and winter camping. All sessions are taught at the beginner level and no prior experience is necessary.

The fee is $200 for applications postmarked by February 10, and $225 after February 10, check or money order only. The fee includes meals and lodging as well as instruction, program materials, and use of demonstration equipment.

Registration is required. Registration forms and more information are posted on the ADFG website, or can be obtained by contacting Tracy Smith in Anchorage at 267-2896 or Kirk Lingofelt in Anchorage at 267-2534, or Patti Berkhahn in Soldotna at 260-2943.

Mail registrations to ADF&G, attention Tracy Smith, Division of Sport Fish, 333 Raspberry Road, Anchorage, Alaska, 99518. Registrations cannot be accepted over the phone or by fax.

Thursday, December 14, 2006

Kodiak to Keep Federal Rural Subsistence

The Federal Subsistence Board ruled yesterday that Kodiak will keep its rural designation. This allows Kodiak residents the right to continue hunting and fishing with a subsistence priority on federal public lands. A huge portion of the Kodiak archipelago is federal.

The Kodiak Daily Mirror reported on the story:

In a unanimous decision, the Federal Subsistence Board ruled this morning that Kodiak city and the surrounding road system will maintain rural status for subsistence hunting and fishing purposes.

The decision means the subsistence rights of the roughly 13,000 people who live on the road system will be protected by the federal government.

The subsistence board met over two days, Tuesday and today, at the Egan Convention Center in Anchorage.

“Every board member spoke (during deliberations this morning) and they all concluded that Kodiak should remain rural,” board spokeswoman Maureen Clark said.

Gary Edwards, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service representative on the board, said during deliberations that Kodiak, given its economy, might be more rural today than it was 15 years ago when the board made its initial determination.


Read the entire article >>>

Kodiak to Keep Federal Rural Subsistence

The Federal Subsistence Board ruled yesterday that Kodiak will keep its rural designation. This allows Kodiak residents the right to continue hunting and fishing with a subsistence priority on federal public lands. A huge portion of the Kodiak archipelago is federal.

The Kodiak Daily Mirror reported on the story:

In a unanimous decision, the Federal Subsistence Board ruled this morning that Kodiak city and the surrounding road system will maintain rural status for subsistence hunting and fishing purposes.

The decision means the subsistence rights of the roughly 13,000 people who live on the road system will be protected by the federal government.

The subsistence board met over two days, Tuesday and today, at the Egan Convention Center in Anchorage.

“Every board member spoke (during deliberations this morning) and they all concluded that Kodiak should remain rural,” board spokeswoman Maureen Clark said.

Gary Edwards, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service representative on the board, said during deliberations that Kodiak, given its economy, might be more rural today than it was 15 years ago when the board made its initial determination.


Read the entire article >>>

Tuesday, December 12, 2006

Kenai Federal Subsistence Subcommittee Formed

After rejecting a proposal to establish a committee to consider Kenai Peninsula subsistence issues on federal lands and waters, the Southcentral Alaska Subsistence Regional Advisory Council voted to establish a Kenai subcommittee.

The new subcommittee will advise the Southcentral council, and is comprised of representatives of various user groups.

The Anchorage Daily News reported "The new subcommittee will include representatives of the Salamatoff, Ninilchik, and Kenaitze tribes; the Kenai River Sportfishing Association; the Kenai River Professional Guides Association; the Upper Cook Inlet Drift Association; the Kenai Peninsula Fisherman's Association; and the communities of Cooper Landing, Hope and Ninilchik, according to program administrators."

Read the entire story in the Anchorage Daily News >>>

Wednesday, December 06, 2006

ADFG Releases 2007 Stocking Plan

From the ADFG website:

"The "Statewide Stocking Plan for Recreational Fisheries, 2007" outlines the objectives as well as the numbers and locations of the recreational stocking efforts by the state hatcheries for the next five years. Over 7 million fish are planned for release annually, at hundreds of locations throughout the state for improving recreational angling opportunities. There has been considerable public input in the development of the long-term stocking plan. In addition, this program is funded with public dollars through the Federal Aid to Sport Fish Restoration (Dingell-Johnson/Wallop-Breaux) funding. This document is available for public review and comment through January 21, 2007. Any changes or additions to the actions outlined in this plan will be advertised in the media for at least 10 days before they occur."

Read the entire page with links to regional plans >>>