Wednesday, December 27, 2006

Upper Kenai, Kasilof Waters Affected by FSB Proposals

The Federal Subsistence Board has published proposals for changes to regulations that will affect sport fishermen on the Kenai Peninsula. There are proposals for subsistence gillnet, dipnet, and rod and reel harvests of salmon, rainbow trout, Dolly Varden, lake trout, etc. The comment deadline is January 5.

Read the proposal packet >>>

Friday, December 22, 2006

Fed Subsistence Board to Meet Jan 9-11

From a USFS News Release

The Federal Subsistence Board will meet Jan. 9-11 from 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily at the Egan Civic and Convention Center, 555 W. 5th Ave., Anchorage. The meeting may conclude early, depending upon when the Board completes its work.

The Board will consider proposals to change Federal subsistence fisheries regulations for the 2007-2008 regulatory year. In addition, the Board will consider funding for subsistence-related research and monitoring projects for 2007 under the Fisheries Resource Monitoring Program.

The Board will consider proposals for Southeast Alaska, Bristol Bay and the Copper River. Proposals to change Federal subsistence fishery regulations on the Kenai Peninsula will be considered when the Board meets in May 2007.

The public is welcome at this meeting. Meeting materials can be found on the Federal Subsistence Management Program website, http://alaska.fws.gov/asm/home.html, under Federal Subsistence Board - Meeting Materials. Questions about the meeting agenda or requests for reasonable accommodations should be directed to Larry Buklis at (800) 478-1456 or (907) 786-3822 or by e-mail, Larry_Buklis@fws.gov.

Monday, December 18, 2006

Becoming an Outdoors Woman - Late March

From an ADFG News Release

The Alaska Department of Fish and Game will host a “Becoming an Outdoors-Woman" workshop on March 24, 25 and 26, 2006, at Victory Bible Camp near Palmer.

“Becoming an Outdoors-Woman” is an international program designed to introduce people to hunting, fishing, and other outdoor activities. Over 40 hands-on sessions are scheduled, including firearm safety, bear safety, bow hunting, trapping, field dressing of fish and game, ice fishing, salmon fishing, fly tying, dog mushing, snow machining, chain saw safety, canning and smoking, and winter camping. All sessions are taught at the beginner level and no prior experience is necessary.

The fee is $200 for applications postmarked by February 10, and $225 after February 10, check or money order only. The fee includes meals and lodging as well as instruction, program materials, and use of demonstration equipment.

Registration is required. Registration forms and more information are posted on the ADFG website, or can be obtained by contacting Tracy Smith in Anchorage at 267-2896 or Kirk Lingofelt in Anchorage at 267-2534, or Patti Berkhahn in Soldotna at 260-2943.

Mail registrations to ADF&G, attention Tracy Smith, Division of Sport Fish, 333 Raspberry Road, Anchorage, Alaska, 99518. Registrations cannot be accepted over the phone or by fax.

Thursday, December 14, 2006

Kodiak to Keep Federal Rural Subsistence

The Federal Subsistence Board ruled yesterday that Kodiak will keep its rural designation. This allows Kodiak residents the right to continue hunting and fishing with a subsistence priority on federal public lands. A huge portion of the Kodiak archipelago is federal.

The Kodiak Daily Mirror reported on the story:

In a unanimous decision, the Federal Subsistence Board ruled this morning that Kodiak city and the surrounding road system will maintain rural status for subsistence hunting and fishing purposes.

The decision means the subsistence rights of the roughly 13,000 people who live on the road system will be protected by the federal government.

The subsistence board met over two days, Tuesday and today, at the Egan Convention Center in Anchorage.

“Every board member spoke (during deliberations this morning) and they all concluded that Kodiak should remain rural,” board spokeswoman Maureen Clark said.

Gary Edwards, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service representative on the board, said during deliberations that Kodiak, given its economy, might be more rural today than it was 15 years ago when the board made its initial determination.


Read the entire article >>>

Kodiak to Keep Federal Rural Subsistence

The Federal Subsistence Board ruled yesterday that Kodiak will keep its rural designation. This allows Kodiak residents the right to continue hunting and fishing with a subsistence priority on federal public lands. A huge portion of the Kodiak archipelago is federal.

The Kodiak Daily Mirror reported on the story:

In a unanimous decision, the Federal Subsistence Board ruled this morning that Kodiak city and the surrounding road system will maintain rural status for subsistence hunting and fishing purposes.

The decision means the subsistence rights of the roughly 13,000 people who live on the road system will be protected by the federal government.

The subsistence board met over two days, Tuesday and today, at the Egan Convention Center in Anchorage.

“Every board member spoke (during deliberations this morning) and they all concluded that Kodiak should remain rural,” board spokeswoman Maureen Clark said.

Gary Edwards, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service representative on the board, said during deliberations that Kodiak, given its economy, might be more rural today than it was 15 years ago when the board made its initial determination.


Read the entire article >>>

Tuesday, December 12, 2006

Kenai Federal Subsistence Subcommittee Formed

After rejecting a proposal to establish a committee to consider Kenai Peninsula subsistence issues on federal lands and waters, the Southcentral Alaska Subsistence Regional Advisory Council voted to establish a Kenai subcommittee.

The new subcommittee will advise the Southcentral council, and is comprised of representatives of various user groups.

The Anchorage Daily News reported "The new subcommittee will include representatives of the Salamatoff, Ninilchik, and Kenaitze tribes; the Kenai River Sportfishing Association; the Kenai River Professional Guides Association; the Upper Cook Inlet Drift Association; the Kenai Peninsula Fisherman's Association; and the communities of Cooper Landing, Hope and Ninilchik, according to program administrators."

Read the entire story in the Anchorage Daily News >>>

Wednesday, December 06, 2006

ADFG Releases 2007 Stocking Plan

From the ADFG website:

"The "Statewide Stocking Plan for Recreational Fisheries, 2007" outlines the objectives as well as the numbers and locations of the recreational stocking efforts by the state hatcheries for the next five years. Over 7 million fish are planned for release annually, at hundreds of locations throughout the state for improving recreational angling opportunities. There has been considerable public input in the development of the long-term stocking plan. In addition, this program is funded with public dollars through the Federal Aid to Sport Fish Restoration (Dingell-Johnson/Wallop-Breaux) funding. This document is available for public review and comment through January 21, 2007. Any changes or additions to the actions outlined in this plan will be advertised in the media for at least 10 days before they occur."

Read the entire page with links to regional plans >>>

Saturday, November 25, 2006

New Alaska fishing book: Kodiak Fishing at any Angle

Kodiak Fishing at any Angle is Bernard Rosenberg's latest contribution to the essentials of an Alaska fishing information library. Recently released with 18 chapters spanning 226 pages and hundreds of color photographs, this one will be an important reference if you are planning to wet a line on Alaska's "emerald isle."

Saturday, November 18, 2006

Fed Subsistence Board Decides for Kenai River Priority

The Federal Subsistence Board in a controversial move on Friday decided that Ninilchik residents have traditional fishing rights on the Kenai River. The Anchorage Daily News reported:

"The board on Friday approved Ninilchik's status for a subsistence preference despite the state's objections, and the Alaska Department of Fish and Game may consider a lawsuit, a department official said. Next spring the federal board will decide how Ninilchik residents may fish in the area, and how many fish they get."

Read the entire article in the Anchorage Daily News >>>

Saturday, November 11, 2006

Time to Revise the Advisory Committee System

From an editorial by ADFG Deputy Commissioner Wayne Regelin in Alaska Wildlife News:

"The Local Fish and Game Advisory Committee system is an essential part of the Board of Fisheries and Board of Game process. It provides an effective mechanism for citizen involvement in the fish and game regulatory process.

The advisory committee system was established in 1959 by the First Alaska State Legislature. Over time, the number of committees has grown without limits or any overall plan. Consequently, today we have an unwieldy 81 advisory committees on the books. Some advisory committees represent numerous villages over extensive areas while others represent single small villages in close proximity to other villages that also have an advisory committee. Some small communities have a difficult time maintaining active advisory committees. Presently, 17 of the 81 committees are inactive and some have been inactive for many years."

Read the entire article >>>

Monday, October 30, 2006

Anglers to Receive ADF&G Sport Fishing Annual Survey

From an ADFG News Release:

On October 30, the Alaska Department of Fish and Game (ADF&G) will begin mailing out 47,000 printed surveys to a sample of 10% of fishing license holders, both resident and non-resident. Called the Statewide Harvest Survey, the questionnaire covers all of Alaska, from Prudhoe Bay to the Southeast Panhandle, and asks anglers where and when they sport fished in Alaska, and how many fish they kept and released in 2006.

Survey responses are used by ADF&G researchers and managers to evaluate the sport fisheries, and to provide guidance to the Alaska Board of Fisheries in the development of management plans.

Researchers in other agencies, Alaskan recreational anglers, as well as visitors from the Lower 48 and from around the world also use the survey results to plan fishing trips and business ventures, and to quote in fishing publications. So if you’re one of the lucky recipients of the survey, it will be one of the ways you can contribute to improving the information that fishery managers, and others, depend on.

The survey comes in booklet form, with maps for every part of the state. Because our state is large, the booklet is also large, but the survey is easy to fill out. Anglers find their fishing spots on the map, then turn to that section of the booklet and write in their fishing information. There is space in the front of the booklet to include notes and comments. A postage-paid envelope accompanies the survey to help with the return.

Survey results for past years are posted on the Division of Sport Fish home page at www.sf.adfg.state.ak.us, under “Sport Fishing Survey Results.”

For more information, call Gretchen Jennings, Program Coordinator, in Anchorage at (907) 267-2404, or gretchen_jennings@fishgame.state.ak.us.

Kenai AC Proposes Anglers Keep Snagged Salmon

Then the Anchorage Daily News:

"Dwight Kramer thinks it's silly to outlaw unintentional snagging of a fish that doesn't like to bite a hook anyway. Last week the Kenai-Soldotna Fish and Game Advisory Committee agreed. It recommended that the state Board of Fisheries remove the prohibition.

The board will consider it at its spring meeting in Anchorage, March 9-13.

Though targeted at the congested Russian River -- a premiere sockeye fishery that the state says averages better than 50,000 fish harvested annually -- the proposal has statewide reach."

Read the entire story in the Anchorage Daily News >>>

Friday, October 27, 2006

Sport Fish Regulations Book Cover Art Contest Announced

From an ADFG News Release:

The Division of Sport Fish is sponsoring its annual contest for cover illustrations for three 2007 sport fishing regulation booklets. Students in grades K-6 who live in southcentral Alaska are invited to enter the contest.

Three booklets are included in the contest: 1) “Southcentral Alaska,” which covers communities in Prince William Sound, the Kenai Peninsula, the Matanuska-Susitna Valley, and the Anchorage area. 2) “Kodiak,” which covers communities on Kodiak Island, the Alaska Peninsula, and the Aleutian Islands. 3) “Bristol Bay,” which includes the communities of Bristol Bay from Pilot Point to Togiak.

Illustrations will be accepted only from students in grades K-6 in those three areas. Illustrations can be in any media, such as paint, colored pencil, marker, or collage, and should show a memorable sport fishing event. Brightly-colored illustrations are preferred.

Submissions should be postmarked no later than December 15, 2006. Submit illustrations to:

Fritz Kraus
ADF&G Division of Sport Fish
333 Raspberry Road
Anchorage, Alaska 99518

For more contest guidelines, visit the Cover Art Contest web page or e-mail Kraus at fritz_kraus@fishgame.state.ak.us.

For additional information contact Fritz Kraus, Anchorage Area Aquatic Education Biologist, (907) 267-2265.

Thursday, October 19, 2006

USFWS Calls for Suggestions on Membership of Federal Subsistence Regional Advisory Councils

From a USFWS News Release dated 17 Oct 206:

The Federal Subsistence Board is accepting written comments and suggestions through Nov. 13, 2006 on alternative methods for assuring balanced membership on Federal subsistence regional advisory councils.

Currently, there are 10 Federal subsistence regional advisory councils around the state. The members of these councils are volunteers and also local users of fish and wildlife resources. They serve a pivotal role in the Federal subsistence program by using their local knowledge and expertise to evaluate regulatory proposals and make recommendations to the Federal Subsistence Board.

The Federal Advisory Committee Act requires that advisory committees have a balanced membership. Current Federal regulations, adopted in 2004, set a goal of 70 percent subsistence users and 30 percent sport and commercial users on the Federal subsistence regional advisory councils. The intent of this regulation was to ensure the appropriate representation and meaningful majority role for rural Alaska residents, while providing appropriate representation for the interests of consumptive users of fish and wildlife on public lands other than rural subsistence users. However, on Aug. 8, 2006 the U.S. District Court for Alaska enjoined the use of this approach, saying the Board failed to articulate its rationale in adopting the 70/30 membership goal.

The Board is seeking written comments and suggestions at this time to consider alternatives that would provide balanced membership on the regional advisory councils. Written comments and suggestions will be accepted through Nov. 13, 2006 and can be sent by e-mail to subsistence@fws.gov, by fax at (907) 786-3898, or by mail to:

Federal Subsistence Board Attn: Theo Matuskowitz
Office of Subsistence Management
3601 C Street, Suite 1030
Anchorage, AK 99503

For additional information, please contact Ann Wilkinson at (800) 478-1456 or (907) 786-3676 or by e-mail, ann_wilkinson@fws.gov.

Wednesday, October 11, 2006

Chitina Dip Net Permits Due 15 October

From an ADFG News Release >>>

The Copper River personal use dip net fishery closed for the season as of September 30, 2006. The dipnetting permits are now due back to ADF&G by October 15. These permits were for dipnetting in the Copper River downstream of the Chitina-McCarthy bridge, near the community of Chitina.

As a reminder, you are required to return your permit even if you did not fish, or even if you went fishing but didn’t catch anything. Continuing the Chitina personal use fishing opportunity largely relies on your compliance with requirements, and your cooperation is greatly appreciated. Failure to return any ADF&G permit is a violation and could result in a $200 fine and loss of future fishing privileges.

Please review the information you wrote down on the permit to make sure it is legible and correct. If no one in your household went dipnetting, please check the “Did Not Fish” box on the permit and return it.

Permits can be mailed to the Department with appropriate postage. For your convenience the address is printed on the back of the permit. Permits can also be delivered to your local ADF&G office during regular business hours.
If you have lost your permit, or if it is too damaged to go through the mail, please mail a letter that includes your name, mailing address, 2006 sport fishing license number, driver’s license number, and names of household members. Please provide a list of each time you went dipnetting, whether you dipnetted from a boat or the shore, and the number of each type of salmon you kept. If you went dipnetting but did not catch any fish, include the date, whether you dipnetted from a boat or the shore, and write “zero.” The letter should be mailed to:

Alaska Department of Fish & Game
Chitina Salmon Permits
333 Raspberry Road
Anchorage AK 99518-1599

More information on the fishery, including examples of how to fill out permits can be found at on the Chitina information page. For additional information contact Mark Sommerville, Area Management Biologist, (907) 822-3309.

Chilkat River Coho Limit Increased

From an ADFG News Release:

The Alaska Department of Fish and Game announced today that sport fishing regulations for coho (silver) salmon in the Chilkat River drainage will be liberalized. Effective 12:01 A.M. on Saturday, October 7, 2006, the bag and possession limits for coho salmon 16 inches or greater in length is six per day and twelve in possession in the Chilkat River drainage. The bag and possession limit for salmon less than 16 inches in length is 10 fish.

The inriver run of coho salmon to the Chilkat River is projected to be above the upper end of the escapement goal this year. As of October 3, a total of 3,808 coho salmon have been caught in the Chilkat River fish wheels. This is the third highest catch on record for this date and nearly 40% greater than the 5 year average of 2,747. The department is currently projecting that the inriver run will exceed 100,000 fish. This is well above the Chilkat River escapement goal of 30,000 to 70,000 coho salmon. Therefore, an increase in the bag and possession limit is warranted.

Anglers are reminded that the liberalized regulations do not apply to the Chilkoot River drainage. The bag and possession limit in the Chilkoot River drainage is two coho salmon. Anglers need to remember that you may legally only have the numbers of fish in your possession for the area you are fishing. For example, if you are fishing in the Chilkoot River, you should have no more than two coho salmon in your possession.

If you need further information concerning this news release call (907) 766-2625 for recorded sport fishing information or call the Division of Sport Fish office in Haines at (907) 766-3638.

For additional information contact Randy Ericksen, Haines/Skagway Area Management Biologist, (907) 766-3638.

Wednesday, October 04, 2006

Kenai School Egg Take Oct 10 & 11

From an ADFG News Release:

The Alaska Department of Fish and Game Aquatic Education Program and the Kenai Peninsula School District will be starting this year’s school “Salmon in the Classroom” projects with two silver (coho) salmon egg-takes at Bear Creek in Seward, October 10 and at the Anchor River Wayside October 11.

Daily schedules are:

9:30 a.m. – 2:00 p.m., Tuesday, October 10 at the Bear Creek weir
10:00 a.m. – 1:45 p.m., Wednesday, October 11 at the Anchor River wayside

The general public may attend these egg-takes.

The eggs for both egg-takes will be taken from Bear Creek fish.

Fourteen Kenai Peninsula area schools are sending approximately 500 students to this event, while eggs will be delivered to 7 schools unable to attend the event. The “Salmon in the Classroom” program is designed to teach students about the life cycle, biology, habitat requirements and anatomy of salmon, Alaska’s most important fish. Each class takes up to 500 eggs for its aquarium, then students observe the developing salmon and record their observations. When the salmon reach the fry stage, sometime in May, the students will release the fish into local designated landlocked lakes or Bear Creek.

Salmon in the Classroom egg-takes will also be held in Anchorage, Palmer, Valdez, Cordova and Kodiak.

Please call Patti Berkhahn in Soldotna at (907) 260-2943, or e-mail at patricia_berkhahn@fishgame.state.ak.us if you have any questions or comments. During the Kenai Peninsula area egg-takes, Patti can be reached at (907) 394-0977.

For additional information contact Patti Berkhahn, Kenai Peninsula Aquatic Education Biologist, (907) 260-2943

Regional Advisory Council Meetings Homer, Delta, Ruby, Kotzebue, Sitka

The Southcentral Alaska Federal Subsistence Regional Advisory Council will meet October 17-19 at the Islands and Ocean Visitor Center in Homer. The meeting will begin at 9 a.m. each day. The public is welcome at this meeting. There will be opportunities for public comment. For more information read the USFWS News Release >>>

The Eastern Interior Federal Subsistence Regional Advisory Council will meet Tuesday and Wednesday, Oct. 17-18, in Delta Junction. The meeting will be held at the Delta Junction Community Hall and will begin at 10 a.m. Tuesday and at 9 a.m. Wednesday. For more information read the USFWS News Release >>>

The Western Interior Federal Subsistence Regional Advisory Council will meet Wednesday and Thursday, Oct. 11-12, in Ruby. The meeting will be held at the Ruby Community Hall and will begin at 9 a.m. For more information read the USFWS News Release >>>

The Northwest Arctic Federal Subsistence Regional Advisory Council will meet Friday, Oct. 13, in Kotzebue. The meeting will be held at the Nullagvik Hotel Meeting Room and will begin at 8:30 a.m. For more information read the USFWS News Release >>>

The Southeast Federal Subsistence Regional Advisory Council will meet Wednesday through Friday, Oct. 11-13, in Sitka. The meeting will be held at the Sitka Community House, Sheetka Kwaan Naa Kahidi, and will begin at 9 a.m. For more information read the USFWS News Release >>>

All USFWS subsistence news releases can be found here: http://alaska.fws.gov/asm/news.cfm?gnr=1

Friday, September 29, 2006

Alaskan Anglers to be Surveyed on Sport Fishing Expenditures

From an ADFG News Release:

Anglers who purchased a state fishing license this year may soon be getting a survey in the mail as part of a federal effort to see how much money saltwater anglers are spending in pursuit of their pastime.

The first survey, the “Saltwater Sport Fishing Expenditure Survey” is being conducted by the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) as part of a multi-state effort among coastal states to find out how much money saltwater sport anglers contribute to their state and national economies, including how many jobs saltwater sport angling supports.

This survey will be sent to randomly-selected anglers, both resident and non-resident, who purchased a sport fishing license in 2006. The survey will ask anglers to estimate how much they spent per trip, and how much they spent during the year. In addition, the survey will ask about basic fishing activities, such as whether anglers fished from shore or from a boat, whether anglers used their own car, or rented a car, and more. All survey responses will be kept strictly confidential.

For more information about the national “Saltwater Sport Fishing Expenditure Survey”, contact Brad Gentner (Brad.Gentner@noaa.gov) at (301) 713-2328, ext. 215.

The second survey, the “Alaska Saltwater Sport Fishing Survey” is also being conducted by NMFS, and examines the factors that affect the number of marine recreational fishing trips taken in Alaska. This survey will help provide state and federal policymakers with accurate information about the economic value of Alaska’s salt water sport fisheries, and the economic impacts of potential changes in the regulations. As with the national survey, all responses will be anonymous.

For more information about the Alaska Saltwater Sport Fishing Survey, contact Dan Lew (Dan.Lew@noaa.gov) at Seattle (206) 526-4252.

Alaska Department of Fish and Game Commissioner McKie Campbell said the Department is very supportive of the NMFS surveys. “If you receive a survey, please fill it out as completely as possible,” he advised anglers. “This information will help provide an accurate picture of the economic value of sport fishing to Alaska and to the nation as a whole.”

Monday, September 25, 2006

Soldotna Meeting to Consider Higher Kenai H.P. Limits

From Alaska State Parks Current News:

Members of the public interested in commenting on a proposal to raise the horsepower limit for boats operating on the Kenai River are invited to offer comments at the Kenai River Special Management Area (KRSMA) Advisory Board's special public meeting on Sept. 28.

The meeting, to be held jointly by the advisory board and the Alaska Division of Parks and Outdoor Recreation, will give the public an opportunity to comment on the recommendations proposed by the Kenai River Special Management Area Advisory Board to create new state regulations raising the limit on engine size from 35 horsepower to 50 horsepower including other changes in state regulations affecting boating on the popular river, said Jack Sinclair, superintendent of parks in the Kenai area.

KRSMA has enforced a 35 horsepower restriction on boats operating on the waters of the Kenai River below Skilak Lake since 1987. At its April meeting, the advisory board members made a decision to address the issue that was described in the Kenai River Special Management Area Comprehensive Plan that calls for the KRSMA Board to determine if changes to the horsepower limit are appropriate. The factors to be considered included: 1.) Ease of enforcement, 2.) Ability to minimize boat wakes and, 3.) The convenience to boaters.

"This is simply housekeeping in that we're making a practical and sensible amendment to the horsepower limit which has really been a good regulation for the river… a regulation that can be better," said KRSMA Board member Jeff King. "We will need the cooperation of our local boat dealers; under no means will a return to any detuning be allowed. We also need a stronger boating education program and continued efforts to get boaters to run the boats responsibly and in the middle of the river allowing the wakes to dissipate."

In addition to the higher horsepower limit, the board's resolution also recommends the division should implement new regulations for boats operating the river to:
  • require all engines in excess of 35 horsepower to comply with 2006 EPA emission requirements for outboard motors
  • require all 50 horsepower engines to be factory-stamped as 50 horsepower engines
  • prohibit operation of larger engines detuned to 50 horsepower
  • prohibit operation of boats larger than 21 feet long, though consideration should be given to longer hulls until 2010
  • require the Division of Parks to conduct an aggressive program to educate all Kenai River boaters on the best practices for minimizing user conflicts and protecting habitat
All interested members of the public are invited to attend the meeting to comment about the proposed regulations, to share their experience and to register their comments on the matter. The advisory board's recommendations will go to the commissioner of the Department of Natural Resources for a final decision.

The Sept. 28 meeting will specifically address the proposed new regulations, and will allow an opportunity for the public to comment. That meeting will start at 6:30 p.m. at the Kenai Borough Assembly Chambers, at 144 N. Binkley St.

Online comments can be entered here.

The division will also welcome written public comments until Oct. 12, 2006. Comments may be sent to the Division of Parks at P.O. Box 1247, Soldotna, AK 99669 or by email at Jack_Sinclair@dnr.state.ak.us

For more information please call Sinclair at 262-5581, ext 1.

2007 Kenai River Special Management Area (KRSMA) Proposed Regulation Change

Applications deadline extended for Kenai River Special Management Area Advisory Board Seats

From Alaska State Parks Current News:

tThe deadline for submitting applications to be considered for one of five board seats on the Kenai River Special Management Area Advisory Board has been extended to September 29. The KRSMA Advisory Board is recruiting for up to five new board members to serve as public member representatives on this board. The KRSMA Board is a 17 member Advisory Board comprised of 9 members representing a broad spectrum of public interests, and 8 members representing various state or federal agencies or local government. Incumbent board members whose terms are expiring this year may also indicate their desire to continue on the board and may be reappointed.

The KRSMA Advisory Board meets monthly except for the summer months and advises the Commissioner of the Department of Natural Resources on issues related to the management of the Kenai River Special Management Area. The Board will be working on the continuing implementation of the recommendations in the Kenai River Comprehensive Management Plan. Some of the special projects that the Board will be addressing over the coming year include reviewing the most recent boat wake study that evaluated wakes produced by different types of boats with different passenger loading, direction of travel, planning or plowing and multiple boat wake effects. In addition, the board will be pursuing recommendations made earlier this year regarding horsepower restrictions and recreational user education.

Landowners, sport or commercial fishermen, recreational boaters or others interested in Kenai River habitat, fish or wildlife resources or recreation issues are urged to apply for a position on the Board. Persons interested in being considered are encouraged to contact Alaska State Parks at 262-5581 or the Kenai River Center at 260-4882 to pick up an advisory Board application.

An application can be downloaded here.

Saturday, September 16, 2006

Ninilchik Sues Feds Over No Fishery

Ninilchik's tribal government is suing Mike Fleagle, the Chair of the Federal Subsistence Board so a subsistence fishery can be created on the Kenai Peninsula's Kasilof River, according to the Anchorage Daily News.

Read the entire story >>>

Saturday, September 09, 2006

Buskin River Silver Limit Increased To 5

From an ADFG News Release:

Beginning at 12:01 a.m. Saturday, September 9, the daily bag limit for silver salmon from the Buskin River drainage will increase to five fish per day and five in possession. On the rest of the Kodiak Road System, the current daily limit for salmon will remain at five, of which only two can be silvers. In addition, Road System streams draining into Chiniak and Monashka bays remain closed to salmon fishing above their highway bridges until the regulatory opening date of September 16.

As of September 7, approximately 8,000 silvers have been counted through the Buskin River weir. This is the highest count on record for this date and over the upper end of the escapement goal range of 3,200 – 7,200 silvers. Since the upper end of the escapement goal has been exceeded, the Buskin River silver salmon bag limit will be increased from 2 to 5 silvers a day.

Thursday, September 07, 2006

Federal Subsistence Board To Consider Regulations

The 10 Federal Subsistence Regional Advisory Councils will meet during the next two months to review proposed changes to Federal subsistence fishing regulations for 2007-2008 and to call for proposals to change wildlife regulations for 2007-2008. The Federal Subsistence Board will consider the Councils' recommendations on fisheries proposals when the Board meets in January. The Councils will also receive updates on this year's fisheries resource monitoring plans and discuss current issues affecting subsistence in their regions. The Council meetings are open to the public.

Read the entire news release >>>

Wednesday, September 06, 2006

Fed Subsistence Board Rejects Kasilof Fishery

The Federal Subsistence Board on Tuesday rejected an attempt to create a new subsistence fishery on the Kenai Peninsula.

According to the Anchorage Daily News, "the Ninilchik tribal government requested the temporary fishery in August, asking that residents in the Sterling Highway community of 785 be allowed to get dipnets in the Kasilof River beginning in September."

Read the entire Anchorage Daily News article >>>

Saturday, September 02, 2006

Ketchikan Creek Open to Sport Fishing

The Alaska Department of Fish and Game, Division of Sport Fish announced recently that Ketchikan Creek will be opened to sport fishing for all species, including king salmon, effective at 12:01 A.M. August 24, 2006 through 11:59 P.M. September 14, 2006. The daily bag and possession limit for king salmon in Ketchikan Creek is two king salmon 28 inches or greater in length and two king salmon less than 28 inches in length. The daily bag and possession limit for all other salmon 16 inches or greater in length is two per day in aggregate, and two in possession. Fishing gear permitted in Ketchikan Creek is single hook, unbaited, artificial lures only.

Read the entire ADFG News Release >>>

Friday, September 01, 2006

F&G Boards Call for Advisory Committee Improvement Ideas

The Alaska Boards of Fisheries and Game are soliciting proposals for improvements in the local fish and game advisory committee system. They also want to see proposals for identifying state "nonsubsistence" areas.

The Boards particularly want to hear proposals on enhancing the effectiveness of the advisory committee system. Proposals are due in December and will be considered the following year.

Read the entire news release >>>

Saturday, August 26, 2006

Kenai sockeye fly fishing extended

The sockeye salmon season for the Russian River/Kenai River fly-fishing-only area was scheduled to close August 20, but because there are large numbers of sockeye salmon passing the sonar station in the lower river, the Alaska Department of Fish and Game will extend the season through 8:00 p.m., Monday, September 4 and increase the bag and possession limit to six salmon. Of the six salmon, only two can be silver (coho) salmon. A total of 6 pink (humpy) salmon may be retained daily in addition to the above limit. This makes the limits for this area the same as the limits set by an Emergency Order issued for the mainstem Kenai River on August 7.

The season extension applies only to the Kenai River from the ferry crossing downstream to the power line. This is “Area A” on page 31 of the Southcentral Alaska regulations summary. The Russian River itself, and the Russian River Sanctuary Area, which are areas B and C, will close to sockeye salmon fishing as scheduled this Sunday, August 20, at 11:59 p.m.

More than 238,000 sockeye salmon have passed the lower river sonar station since August 5, and these salmon may be available in the “fly-fishing-only” area after the August 20 sockeye salmon sport fishing closure date.

The “fly-fishing-only” restriction is also lifted for the season extension. Anglers may continue to use either a single hook unbaited fly, or a single hook, unbaited artificial lure. The gap between point and shank must be 3/8” or less. A single hook has only one point. If beads or other attractors are used, they must be fixed within two inches of the hook, or be free-sliding along the entire length of the line or leader.

Anglers are reminded that fishing for king salmon, or keeping accidentally-caught king salmon, is not allowed in the entire upper Kenai River. Be sure you know how to identify your catch. King salmon often have a black or dark gumline, while silver salmon have a white or light gumline. King salmon also usually have small black spots on both the upper and lower lobes of the tail fin, while silvers have spots only on the upper lobe of the tail fin.

If you fillet your fish in the Russian River area, please continue to chop up the carcasses into small pieces and throw the pieces into deep, fast-moving water. It takes just a few extra seconds, and is very easy to do. It reduces the piles of carcasses, which, in turn, reduces the attraction for bears.

Also because of bear activity, federal land managers continue to enforce their orders that close the area from 11 p.m. to 6 a.m., close the area to tent camping, and require that food or trash be in your possession, or within immediate grasp. A locally-available radio station at AM 1600 broadcasts updates for the area, and there is also an informational video playing at the Russian River ferry shack.

From an ADFG News Release >>>

Personal use king crab closures in SE Alaska announced

The Alaska Department of Fish and Game announced on August 25th that the red and blue king crab personal use fishery in the Port Frederick, Seymour Canal, and Peril Strait areas will remain closed for the season. These areas are defined as follows:
(1) Port Frederick (all waters of Port Frederick south and west of a line between the light at Cannery Point to the northernmost tip of Halibut Island and from there to a point at 58° 09.60’ N. latitude 135° 30.00’ W. longitude) and;

(2) Section 11-D, Seymour Canal (waters of Seymour Canal north of 57° 37.00’N. latitude) and;

(3) Section 13-C, Peril Strait (all waters of Peril Strait, Hoonah Sound, Rodman Bay and contiguous waters west of a line from Point Hayes to Point Thatcher and north of a line from Pogibshi Point due west to the Chichagof shoreline).
Read the entire news release >>>

Sunday, August 13, 2006

Hot threads from the Alaska Fishing Forum

Tuesday, July 11, 2006

New Chitina Fishing Dates Announced

The Chitina Subdistrict will be open from 12:01 A.M. Monday July 17 until 11:59 P.M. Sunday July 23. This announcement does not change the sixth opening of the Chitina Subdistrict, which will remain at 12:01 A.M. July 10 through 11:59 P.M. July 16. There will be no supplemental harvest allowed for the personal use dip net salmon fishery in the Chitina Subdistrict during either of these periods.

Read the entire ADFG news release >>>

Monday, July 10, 2006

Kvichak/Iliamna Red Limits Increase

Because of a recent inseason projection exceeding 2 million red salmon, the Alaska Department of Fish and Game is rescinding Emergency Order 2-RS-5-02-06 and the bag limit for red salmon increases from two fish to five fish per day in all waters of the Kvichak River / Lake Iliamna drainage, in compliance with the “Kvichak River Sockeye Salmon Management Plan.” The bag limit increase applies to the waters of the Kvichak, Newhalen, and Tazimina rivers and their tributaries, and lakes Clark, Sixmile, Iliamna, and all other tributaries into these lakes.

In addition, the following waters will reopen to sport fishing for red salmon:

1. Alexey Creek and all waters within 150 yards of its confluence with the Newhalen River;

2. The waters of Sixmile Lake and one-quarter mile downstream of Sixmile Lake in the Newhalen River and the lower one-quarter mile of the Tazimina River;

3. All waters within one-half-mile of the confluence of the Gibraltar River with Lake Iliamna; and

4. The waters of the Kvichak River adjacent to the community of Igiugig as posted between ADF&G regulatory markers.

The Alaska Board of Fisheries adopted the “Kvichak River Sockeye Salmon Management Plan” as 5 AAC 67.025 in January 2001. The Kvichak’s pre-season forecast was 1.9 million red salmon, which is below the minimum 2 million fish required to meet the Biological Escapement Goal. However, with current passage rates past the Kvichak tower, Kvichak inriver estimates, aerial survey estimates, and the genetics data from the Port Moller test fishery, it is apparent the minimum escapement of 2 million will be exceeded this season.

For more information, call the ADF&G Dillingham Area Office at (907) 842-2427, or the Dillingham recorded telephone hotline at (907) 842-REGS (842-7347).

Sunday, July 09, 2006

Russian Red Run Rising

Red salmon numbers in the popular Russian River fishery on the Kenai Peninsula have surged over 200% in the last three decades, according to the Anchorage Daily News.

Author Craig Medred writes "There are so many, in fact, that fishery managers sometimes question the ability of anglers to catch enough. Already this year, the early run of fish has exceeded what biologists peg as the maximum spawning goal by some 20,000 fish. This has become the norm."

Fisheries scientists believe that much of the increase can be attributed to global warming.

Saturday, July 08, 2006

Increased Fishing Opportunity On Kasilof

An early and strong sockeye return on the Kasilof River has led the Alaska Department of Fish and Game to expand opportunity effective Saturday, July 8th.

Two ADFG news releases detail the increased opportunity. The first news release details the opening of part of the area to dipnetting. The second order doubles bag and quadruples possession limits on the Kasilof.

Additional details can be found in the news releases.

Unalakleet, Shaktoolik Rivers Closed To King Fishing

The Division of Sport Fisheries closed the Unlalakleet and Shaktoolik river drainages to the retention or possession of king salmon, effective 12:01 P.M. Saturday, July 8, 2006. This Emergency Order prohibits the harvest of king salmon while sport fishing in these waters. In addition, this Emergency Order prohibits the use of bait in these drainages. This Emergency Order will remain in effect through August 15, 2006 or until additional in-season assessments suggest that escapement goals will be met for king salmon on the Unalakleet and Shaktoolik rivers.

Read the entire ADFG news release >>>

Thursday, July 06, 2006

Port Graham/English Bay Area Reopened for Sockeye

The English Bay River drainage and Port Graham Subdistrict reopened to sport fishing for sockeye salmon at 12:01 a.m., Thursday, July 6, 2006, according to an Alaska Department of Fish and Game news release.

A count within the escapement goal of 6,000 – 13,500 can now be projected for the English Bay drainage. The subsistence set gillnet fishery has been reopened. The small number of sockeye salmon harvested by sport anglers is unlikely to jeopardize the escapement or achievement of broodstock goals.

The English Bay River drainage is open to fishing for salmon from its mouth, including the lagoon, upstream to the outlet of Lower English Bay Lake. These waters are fly-fishing-only from June 1 through July 31. The remainder of the drainage is closed to salmon fishing.

The Port Graham Subdistrict includes all waters east of the longitude of Point Bede at 151º 59.40’ and south of the latitude of Point Pogibshi at 59º 25.47.

Consult the 2006 Alaska Sport Fishing Regulations Summary - Southcentral Alaska edition for other pertinent fishing regulations.

For additional information contact Nicky Szarzi, Area Management Biologist, (907) 235-8191.

Wednesday, July 05, 2006

Chitina Schedule For July 10 - 16

The Chitina Subdistrict will be open from 12:01 A.M. Monday July 10 until 11:59 P.M. Sunday July 16. This announcement does not change the fifth opening of the Chitina Subdistrict, which will remain at 12:01 A.M. July 3 through 11:59 P.M. July 9. There will be no supplemental harvest allowed for the personal use dip net salmon fishery in the Chitina Subdistrict during either of these periods.

Homer Spit Snagging Open 6 - 9 July

In order to help anglers harvest the remainder of the hatchery-produced king salmon, snagging will be permitted in the Nick Dudiak Fishing Lagoon area on the Homer Spit beginning at noon on Thursday, July 6, until midnight, Sunday, July 9, according to an Alaska Department of Fish and Game News Release.

All other regulations pertaining to this fishery remain in effect. These include the daily bag limit of two king salmon of any size. Because there is an annual limit of five king salmon 20 inches or longer, after harvesting a king salmon 20 inches or longer, the harvest must be recorded, in ink, immediately on the back of the license or on a harvest record card. A harvested fish counts toward the bag limit of the person originally hooking it.

After July 9, the Nick Dudiak Fishing Lagoon will again be closed to snagging.

The Lagoon area includes the waters from the Homer City Dock (near the entrance to the Homer Boat Harbor) northwest along the east side of the Homer Spit to the department marker approximately 200 yards northwest of the entrance to the Lagoon, and out 300 feet from the shore.

For additional information contact Nicole Szarzi, Area Management Biologist, (907) 235-8191.

King Closure Bear Cove Near Sitka

Sitka – The Alaska Department of Fish and Game (ADF&G) announced recently that effective 12:01 a.m. Thursday, July 6, sport fishing for king salmon in Bear Cove will be closed to protect brood stock returning to Medvejie Hatchery. This closure includes all waters east of a line between ADF&G regulatory markers located on the north and south shores of Bear Cove. Anglers may not have any king salmon in possession while fishing in this closed area, regardless of where the king salmon were caught.

King salmon returning to Medvejie Hatchery are not expected to meet brood stock goals in 2006 due to poor ocean survival. Ocean survival of king salmon returning to Medvejie Hatchery this year is estimated at less than 1%. This is less than the ten year average ocean survival of 2.5%. As of July 3, 2006, only 1,000 king salmon were observed in Bear Cove. An additional 3,500 fish are needed to meet brood stock needs. This sport fishery closure is therefore necessary to help ensure king salmon brood stock needs at Medvejie Hatchery are achieved.

Anyone needing further information concerning this announcement should contact the Division of Sport Fish in Sitka at (907)747-5355.

Mat Su Kings and Silvers: New Sport Fish Publications

The Alaska Division of Sport Fisheries has produced two new publications for Alaska anglers. The first is on king salmon fishing, the second is on silver salmon fishing.

Both publications exist in Adobe Acrobat format and can be downloaded from the ADFG website. Eachcontains substantial text and a number of photos and maps.

Karluk King Salmon Bag and Possession Reduced

The bag and possession limit for Karluk River drainage king salmon 20 inches or longer was reduced to 1 per day and 1 in possession on Saturday, July 1, according to an Alaska Department of Fish and Game News Release.

As of June 27, the king salmon escapement in the Karluk River was 3,002 fish, which is the second lowest on record for this time of year. To date, the inriver sport harvest is estimated to be 450 fish, and daily escapement counts have been steadily declining. In order to allow for continued sport harvest, and to ensure that the spawning escapement goal of 3,600 – 7,300 king salmon will be achieved by the end of the season, the daily limits must be reduced.

Kodiak Sockeye Seasons Close Early

Sport fishing for king and sockeye (red) salmon in the entire Ayakulik River drainage closed at 12:01 a.m. on Saturday, July 1, due to record low escapements for both species. Additionally, the sockeye salmon sport fishery in the entire Afognak River drainage and nearby marine waters closed at the same time. This from an Alaska Department of Fish and Game news release.

The Ayakulik River weir counts as of June 26 were 1,931 king salmon and 39,774 sockeye salmon, which are the lowest counts on record for this date. Based on historic run timing, current projections indicate that the minimum escapement goals of 4,800 king salmon and 200,000 sockeye salmon are unlikely to be achieved.

The minimum sockeye salmon escapement goal for Afognak River is 20,000 fish. As of June 26, the weir count was 11,700 fish, the lowest escapement on record for this date. Based on historic return timing, current projections indicate the Afognak River may only attain an escapement under 15,000 sockeye salmon for the season. The closed area will include all fresh waters of the Afognak River drainage, as well as those salt waters of Afognak Bay inside of a line from Settlement Point (58°03.00 N lat., 152°43.70’ W long.) to Otrubistoi Point (58° 02.00’ N lat., 152° 45.50’ W long.).

New Personal Use Shrimp Fishery: North Gulf Coast

In March, the Alaska Board of Fisheries created a personal use pot shrimp fishery for the waters of the North Gulf Coast from Aialik Cape west to Gore Point. This regulation went into effect at 12:01 a.m., Saturday, July 1, according to an Alaska Department of Fish & Game News Release. Aialik Cape is south of Seward; Gore point is to the west, 48 km (30 mi) SE of Seldovia.

A free permit, the “North Gulf Coast Shrimp Harvest Record,” is required. Harvest records will be available only at the Alaska Bureau of Wildlife Enforcement office in Seward, and at ADF&G offices in Anchorage and Homer. The harvest record is not available on line.

The regulations will be similar to the Prince William Sound recreational shrimping regulations, which can be found on page 63 of the Southcentral Alaska fishing regulation booklet.
  • Open April 15 through September 15.
  • A limit of 5 pots per person and 5 pots per vessel.
  • Gear requirements, such as mesh size and escape mechanisms, are the same as Prince William Sound.
  • Buoy marking requirements also the same as Prince William Sound, with the addition of a permit number.
Since this is a “personal use” fishery, it is open to Alaska residents only. A 2006 resident Alaska sport fishing license, or ADF&G Permanent ID Card, or ADF&G Disabled Veteran’s Card is required in order to pick up the free harvest record, and to participate in the fishery.

Friday, June 30, 2006

Ketchikan Areas Closed to Shrimp Sport Fishing

According to an ADF&G news release, the Alaska Board of Fisheries closed sport fishing for shrimp in areas previously closed to commercial shrimp fishing. One of the areas closed is in the Ketchikan vicinity. The closed area is defined as the waters east of a line from Indian Point at 55° 36.85' N. lat., 131° 42.02' W. long., to the northeasternmost tip of Betton Island at 55° 31.95' N. lat., 131° 46.37' W. long., to the southeasternmost tip of Betton Island at 55° 29.90' N. lat., 131° 48.18' W. long., to Survey Point at 55° 28.07' N. lat., 131° 49.87' W. long. Please note that personal use and subsistence shrimp fishing remains open in this area.

In another news release, ADFG reported of the areas closed is in vicinity of Hollis. The closed area is defined as the waters of Twelve-mile Arm west of a line from Prince of Wales Island at 55° 29.07' N. lat., 132° 37.60' W. long., to the northeasternmost tip of Loy Island at 55° 29.07' N. lat., 132 36.70' W. long., to the easternmost tip of Cat Island at 55° 27.80' N. lat., 132° 39.08' W. long., to Prince of Wales Island at 55° 27.80' N. lat., 132° 40.93' W. long., including waters nearest Hollis Anchorage. Personal use and subsistence shrimp fishing remains open in this area.

Here are maps of the two closed areas: Ketchikan | Hollis

Russian River Sanctuary Area to Open Wednesday, June 21

The Department of Fish and Game announced recently that the Russian River Sanctuary Area will be open to sockeye salmon sport fishing at 6:00 a.m., Wednesday, June 21.

The Russian River Sanctuary Area includes waters upstream from ADF&G markers located just downstream of the ferry crossing on the Kenai River to markers about 300 yards upstream of the public boat launch at Sportsman's Landing. The Sanctuary Area also includes the waters around the upstream end of the island near the Russian River mouth, and the Russian River itself from its mouth upstream 100 yards to ADF&G markers. A map to the area can be found on page 31 of the 2006 Southcentral Alaska sport fishing regulation booklet.

The sockeye salmon bag and possession limit will remain at 3 fish.

Department staff have determined that the low end of the early-run sockeye salmon spawning escapement goal of 14,000 fish through the weir will be achieved. More than 10,000 sockeye salmon have moved above the waters that are currently open, with approximately 5,000-6,000 additional fish in the Sanctuary Area.

Please respect the new riverbank habitat restoration project and stay on established pathways in the Sanctuary Area.

Kodiak In Season changes

The daily bag limit for sockeye salmon in the Afognak River drainage and nearby salt waters will be reduced to one fish per day, and one in possession, beginning Thursday, June 22, according to an Alaska Department of Fish and Game news release.

Sockeye salmon escapement in the Afognak River has been well behind the desired level throughout June. As of June 18, a total of 8,085 fish have been counted through the weir. The current weir count and average run timing information indicates that the minimum desired escapement of 20,000 sockeye salmon might not be achieved by the end of the season. The department will continue to monitor sockeye salmon escapement in the Afognak River and, if necessary, impose additional fishing restrictions to achieve the escapement goal.

Also at Kodiak, the bag and possession limit for Buskin River sockeye (red) salmon 20 inches or longer will increase to 5 per day and 5 in possession, effective June 22 through July 15. The bag limit for sockeye salmon under 20 inches remains 10 per day and 10 in possession.

The escapement goal for sockeye salmon into Buskin Lake is a range of 8,000 to 13,000 fish. As of June 20, 9,347 sockeye salmon have entered Buskin Lake. Based previous year’s runs, projections indicate that 14,500 sockeye salmon could escape into Buskin Lake.

Sitka Sound Special Use Area Closed to Shrimp Sport Fishing

Shrimp sport fishing has been closed in most of Sitka Sound, according to an Alaska Department of Fish and Game news release. The area was previously closed to commercial shrimping; this action by the Alaska Board of Fisheries extends the closure to sport fishing. Personal use and subsistence sport fishing remain open.

Thursday, June 29, 2006

Montana Outdoors Directory online

While not specifically Alaska fishing news, this is an important announcement for the Outdoors Supersite (tm) network, now grown to three states.

Aaron and Jill Bork have been working hard for months now to prepare an outdoors website
for Montana. While they would be first to say that there is much yet to do, I think you'll find that there is a LOT of quality information on
Montana Outdoors Directory about Treasure State hunting and fishing even at this early stage in the website's development. Subject areas right now include hunting, fishing, forums (they use the
same vBulletin software that Alaska Outdoors Directory uses), services, and bookstore.
They plan to continue adding quality information about Montana hunting and fishing, but also expanding to other outdoor activities in "Big Sky Country." Take a look at Montana
Outdoors Directory
today. If you're quick, you can take first post on the new forums.

Meanwhile, Dan Schwartz at Colorado Outdoors Directory continues to work on his website, announced earlier here. His next move is to add vBulletin forums too. We'll announce that here as soon as the new forums are online.

We look forward to continuing to work together with the Borks and Dan as they develop their Outdoors Supersites™ websites.

Monday, June 26, 2006

Kenai River section closed after bear attacks

Officials closed a portion of the Kenai River after two bears were shot this past weekend. Neither bear was killed outright after being shot with .44 caliber pistols. A sow and cubs was involved in one of the charges.

Read the entire story in the Anchorage Daily News >>>

Wednesday, June 21, 2006

Chitina open June 26 - July 2

The Chitina Subdistrict will be open from 12:01 A.M. Monday June 26 until 11:59 P.M. Sunday July 2, according to an Alaska Department of Fish and Game news release. This announcement does not change the third opening of the Chitina Subdistrict, which will remain at 12:01 A.M. June 19 through 11:59 P.M. June 25. There will be no supplemental harvest allowed for the personal use dip net salmon fishery in the Chitina Subdistrict during either of these periods.

Read the entire ADFG news release >>>

Saturday, June 17, 2006

Ketchikan Terminal King Fishery Thru July 31

ADFG announced recently that the bag and possession limit for king salmon in two Ketchikan terminal sport fishery areas is 12 king salmon of any size, effective 12:01 A.M. June 12 through 11:59 P.M. July 31, 2006. King salmon caught in the terminal harvest areas by nonresidents DO NOT COUNT toward the annual limit.

Read the entire ADFG News Release >>>

Wrangell Narrows King Bag Increased

The Alaska Department of Fish and Game announced on June 16 an increase in the bag and possession limit for king salmon in the Wrangell Narrows-Blind Slough Terminal Harvest Area from June 1 through July 31. In this area, the sport fishing bag and possession limits for all anglers will be three king salmon 28 inches or greater in length and three king salmon less than 28 inches in length.

Read the entire ADFG News Release >>>

Thursday, June 15, 2006

Ayakulik King Limit Reduced

Because of the weak return of king salmon to the Ayakulik River, the bag and possession limit for king salmon 20 inches or longer is reduced from 3 per day, 3 in possession to 1 fish per day, 1 in possession, effective 12:01 a.m., Thursday, June 15, 2006. The bag limit for king salmon under 20 inches in length is not restricted and remains 10 per day, 10 in possession.

The Department anticipates that this reduction should provide an additional 200 king salmon to the Ayakulik River spawning escapement.

Read the entire ADFG News Release >>>

Kenai River King Anglers Allowed Bait Below Moose River

Thanks to a good in-river return of early-run king salmon, combined with below-average angler effort and harvests, sport fish anglers may now use bait in the Kenai River mainstem from its mouth upstream to a point 100 yards downstream of the confluence of the Moose River and Kenai River, beginning at 12:01 a.m., Saturday, June 10.

All other Kenai River special provisions, methods and means and bag and possession limits remain in affect. Anglers may only use one single-pointed hook. Anglers may keep only those king salmon that are less than 44 inches in length or 55 inches or greater in length. All other king salmon must be released immediately.

Read the entire ADFG news release >>>

Chitina Dipnet Schedule Amended

The Chitina Subdistrict will be open from 12:01 A.M. Monday June 19 until 11:59 P.M. Sunday June 25. There will be no supplemental harvest allowed for the personal use dip net salmon fishery in the Chitina Subdistrict during this period.

This announcement does not change the second opening of the Chitina Subdistrict, which will remain at 12:01 A.M. June 12 through 11:59 P.M. June 19 and include a supplemental harvest period.

Read the entire ADFG news release >>>

Ninilchik River Open Again For Hatchery Kings

The Ninilchik River is open to fishing for hatchery king salmon through Friday, July 14, 2006. Wild king salmon may not be retained or possessed. Hatchery fish can be recognized by their missing adipose fin and healed fin clip scar. King salmon intended for release may not be removed from the water.

Read the entire ADFG News Release >>>

Juneau King Crab Fishery Opens July 1

The summer personal use red and blue king crab season in Section 11-A will open on July 1 and will continue through September 30, 2006 or until the summer allocation has been harvested, according to an Alaska Department of Fish and Game News Release. The red and blue king crab daily bag and possession limits for Section 11-A will be 2 legal male red or blue king crab per person. The summer seasonal household bag limit will be 20 red or blue king crab.

ADFG is reminding fishermen that they must also obtain a valid resident sport-fishing license if 16 years or older or must have a permanent identification card if a resident 60 years old or older prior to harvesting king crab.

Taiya Inlet King Regs Liberalized

The Alaska Department of Fish and Game announced recently that special king salmon regulations for anglers fishing in Taiya Inlet north of the latitude of Taiya Point will be in effect from June 5 through July 31, 2006.

During this period, the bag and possession limit in Taiya Inlet is three king salmon of any size, and king salmon caught in Taiya Inlet do not count toward the nonresident annual limit. This additional opportunity is being provided to allow harvest of hatchery-produced king salmon released at Pullen Creek, where runs are expected to exceed broodstock needs.

Read the entire ADFG News Release >>>

Monday, June 12, 2006

Hot Threads on the Alaska Fishing Forum

Friday, June 02, 2006

Kelp Harvest Illegal In SC Alaska

ADFG staff are reminding the public that the harvest of kelp and other aquatic plants is not legal in the marine waters of southcentral Alaska. These aquatic plants provide important habitat for a variety of species, and are used by herring for spawning in the spring.

Read the entire news release >>>

Juneau Fishing Regs Relaxed For Kings

The Alaska Department of Fish and Game announced today that king salmon sport fishing regulations in freshwater drainages on the Juneau road system that are open to sport fishing will be liberalized to provide recreational anglers additional opportunity to harvest surplus hatchery king salmon.

The new regulations are as follows:
  • The daily bag and possession limit is 4 king salmon, no size limit.
  • King salmon harvested by nonresidents do not count toward their annual limit.
Read the entire news release >>>

Juneau area terminal hatchery harvest area regulations are also now more liberal to harvest surplus hatchery kings. The area with relaxed regulations is described in another ADFG news release.

Thursday, June 01, 2006

Copper River dipnet opening scheduled for June 9

An ADF&G news release notes that the Chitina Subdistrict will be open from 12:01 P.M. Friday June 9 until 8:00 P.M. Sunday June 11. Due to late breakup conditions, salmon migration into the Copper River is approximately a week to two weeks delayed. As a result fishing time in the personal use fishery opening during the week of June 5 – 11 has been reduced from the preseason schedule for this period.

Read the entire news release >>>

Monday, May 29, 2006

Copper River Dipnetting Closed Until At Least June 5

ADFG reports "The Chitina Subdistrict will remain closed until at least Monday June 5. Due to late breakup conditions, salmon migration into the Copper River is approximately two weeks delayed. It is anticipated that fish passage past the Miles Lake sonar will be sufficient to allow a personal use fishery opening during the week of June 5 – 11. The duration of this opening will be announced after May 29th."

Read the entire ADFG News Release >>>

SE Fishing Guides & Charter Crews Cannot Keep Fish

The Alaska Department of Fish and Game announced that "sport fishing charter operators, guides and crew are prohibited from retaining any fish species while paying clients are on board the vessel. This regulation change became effective at 12:01 A.M. Friday May 26, 2006." This applies to the marine waters of Southeast Alaska

The regulation reads "A sport fishing guide and sport fishing crew member working on a charter vessel in the salt waters of Southeast Alaska, excluding the Yakutat area may not retain fish while clients are on board the vessel."

Read the entire ADFG News Release >>>

King Salmon Fishing Regs Liberalized near Juneau

ADFG announced recently that king salmon regulations have been liberalized in part of the marine waters near Juneau. The relaxed regulations will be in effect through June 30, 2006.

Read the complete ADFG News Release >>>

USFS & Anchor Point Chamber host kids' fishing events on Saturday June 10

The Chugach National Forest Glacier Ranger District is hosting a Youth Fishing Day for kids 15 years and younger at Moose Flats, 1 mile (approx.) down Portage Valley Highway on the left. This year's event will take place on Saturday, June 10 from 11:00am-2:00pm.

An all-accesible pier and picnic tables are available. The USFS says "Bring your pole and get some fishing tips from the Forest Service experts."

Further down the Kenai, the Anchor Point Chamber of Commerce is hosting another kids' fishing event on the same day. (Check to confirm the date; the website says both June 10 and June 11)

The Chamber says there will be "a big fish contest and casting contests with the large fish going on to state and national competition, plus locally sponsored prizes. All events are free to kids under the age of 16. Enjoy the picnic provided for contestants and families."

2006 Sport Fishing regulations errors noted

The Division of Sport Fish has noted three errors in the 2006 sport fishing regulations. The areas affected are the Upper Kenai, and Prince William Sound.

Read the entire ADFG news release >>>

Kodiak's Pillar Creek opened for kings in June & July

A portion of Kodiak Island's Pillar Creek has been opened to fishing for king salmon this summer, according to an Alaska Department of Fish and Game news release. Only kings may be kept. Fishing can begin on June first, and ends on July 31st.

Read the entire ADFG news release >>

ADFG Requests Tagged Rainbow Reports

The Division of Sport Fish is requesting angler reports of tagged rainbow trout in Willow Creek, north of Wasilla, and other Susitna drainages.

"Although Willow Creek supports a popular rainbow trout fishery, the number of trout spawning in Willow Creek is unknown," the ADFG news release noted. "The goal of the study is to collect information to help the Division sustain the fishery through appropriate management."

"Tagged rainbow trout may move to other tributaries of the Susitna River. Anyone catching a tagged rainbow trout is asked to note the tag number and contact the Division of Sport Fish with the number plus the location and date of capture. Please do not remove the tag from the fish."

Thursday, May 18, 2006

King regs liberalized near Stikine

The Alaska Department of Fish and Game (ADF&G) announced recently that sport fishing regulations for king salmon will be liberalized in the marine waters of District 8 near Petersburg and Wrangell from May 1 through July 15, 2006.

In January the Alaska Board of Fisheries (Board) approved a Stikine River king salmon management plan for commercial and sport fisheries in District 8. For sport anglers, this management plan includes provisions to liberalize the sport fishery in years when an allowable catch exists for Stikine River king salmon. The liberalized sport fishing regulations will be in effect in the salt waters of Sections 8-A and 8-B. Read the entire news release (with maps) >>>

Southeast Alaska rockfish regulation announcement

The Alaska Department of Fish and Game has made a correction to an announcement issued Monday May 8th that established the sport fishing bag and possession limits, mandatory retention and a nonresident annual limit established for non-pelagic rockfish (demersal shelf rockfish) for the 2006 season. The correction is for yelloweye rockfish. The following regulations become effective 12:01 A.M. May 16, 2006. The regulations are:

Ø The resident and nonresident bag limit is three non-pelagic rockfish only one of which can be a yelloweye; all non-pelagic rockfish caught must be retained until the bag limit is reached.

Ø The nonresident annual limit is three yelloweye rockfish.

Ø Charter operators and crewmembers may not retain non-pelagic rockfish while clients are on board the vessel.

These regulations apply in all marine waters of Southeast Alaska as a means to keep regulations consistent, avoid angler confusion, and make enforcement easier.

The Board of Fisheries during the February 2006 meeting cited biological concerns over recent sport fishery harvests of non-pelagic rockfish (demersal shelf rockfish) and adopted provisions for the sport fishery to curtail harvest. The Board allocated 16% of the total allowable biological catch to the sport fishery which equates to 66 metric tons for the 2006 season. The provisions being instituted for the 2006 season are anticipated to reduce the non-pelagic rockfish harvest by 30-35% from 2004-2005 levels. Read the news release >>>

Rainbow bag reduced in Anchorage area waters

Effective Saturday, May 13, the bag and possession limit for rainbow trout in Anchorage’s stocked lakes and streams will be reduced to 2 per day, 2 in possession. Only one trout may be 20 inches or longer.

In past years, over 106,000 rainbows were released every year into Anchorage area waters, according to Dan Bosch, Assistant Area Management Biologist for the Alaska Department of Fish and Game. This year, only one-third of that amount, or about 35,000 fish, is available for Anchorage due to the loss of warm water at the state fish hatcheries.

With such low numbers available for stocking, the department wants to allow anglers to fish them, but limit the harvest to help ensure good fishing throughout the summer. On the bright side, this summer’s rainbow trout will be much larger than other years, about 12 inches long, and they will weigh about half a pound at the time they are released. Bosch expects these larger fish to be very popular this summer. Read entire news release >>>

Bristol Bay sport fishing outlook released

The Division of Sport Fisheries has released its 2006 management outlook for sport fishing in the Bristol Bay area. The publication lists watersheds and indicates what anglers can likely expect this season.

The report says, "The Bristol Bay Management Area contains some of the world's most productive waters for all five species of Pacific salmon as well as rainbow trout, Arctic grayling, Arctic char, and Dolly Varden. Anglers can also find northern pike, lake trout, burbot, and several species of whitefish. Popular major drainages include the Nushagak/ Mulchatna rivers, the Wood River lakes system, the Kvichak River and Lake Iliamna, the Naknek River and the Togiak River. The major rivers and lakes, as well as the many smaller tributaries, provide unparalleled angling opportunities."

Small section of Kenai River closed to fishing

The Alaska Division of Commercial Fisheries is operating a smolt counting trap near Mile 45 of the Kenai River, and has closed that area of the watershed to sport fishing through June 25.

The trap and sonar equipment are anchored to the river bottom so waters within 300 feet will be off limits. ADFG is recommending caution in the area because of the anchoring cables.

Thursday, May 04, 2006

Chitina dipnet opening scheduled

The first opening of the 2006 Copper River Chitina Subdistrict Personal Use Dipnet Salmon Fishery is tentatively scheduled to open on Saturday, June 3rd at 12:01 PM and close on Sunday, June 4th at 8:00 PM for a 32-hour opening., according to an Alaska Department of Fish and Game news release.

Wednesday, May 03, 2006

Revised fishing forum available for posting

After years of using the same forum software, the Alaska Outdoors Forums have installed a new system, vBulletin, to accomodate the increasing numbers of visitors to OutdoorsDirectory.com

The new system offers a variety of thread views and a many more options for users to configure their own views of the forum.

The existing forums will continue to operate for some weeks while OutdoorsDirectory.com staff observes the new forum software. Eventually the old forums will be made "read only" so they can be used for archives.

Sunday, April 30, 2006

Recent Threads on the Alaska Fishing Forum

Friday, April 28, 2006

King salmon fishing liberalized near Wrangell

The Alaska Department of Fish and Game (ADF&G) announced recently "that sport fishing regulations for king salmon will be liberalized in the marine waters of District 8 near Petersburg and Wrangell from May 1 through July 15, 2006. In January the Alaska Board of Fisheries (Board) approved a Stikine River king salmon management plan for commercial and sport fisheries in District 8. For sport anglers, this management plan includes provisions to liberalize the sport fishery in years when an allowable catch exists for Stikine River king salmon. "

Read the entire news release >>>

SE Alaska filleting, deheading prohibited in some fisheries

ADF&G has announced a prohibition onfilleting and deheading certain fish while creel surveys are ongoing in certain SE Alaska communities at certain times during the summer fishing season.

Marine boat anglers returning to ports where and when on site ADF&G creel surveys are conducted will again be prohibited from filleting, mutilating, and de-heading sport caught lingcod, king salmon, coho salmon, and non-pelagic rockfish. Marine boat anglers returning to any port on the road system of the communities identified below, during the designated times, may not fillet, mutilate, or de-head these fish until the fish have been brought to shore and offloaded, unless the fish have been consumed or preserved onboard.

Read the complete news release >>>>

New fishing videos on OutdoorsDirectory

Here are a couple of new DVD products in the Outdoors Alaska Online Bookstore that will be of interest for anglers looking for remote fishing opportunities not too far from Anchorage.

PRODUCTS: 24 April 2006: The Talachulitna Creek and Talachulitna River are tributaries of the Susitna Drainage hosting some of the largest king salmon in the world. Using the right techniques during the peak of the run, the Talachulitna River will produce 20+ kings per day to the hand.

PRODUCTS: 24 April 2006: Lake Creek is a fun and exciting wild Alaska river. Just a short plane flight from Anchorage, float from the base of the Alaska range near Mt. McKinley for 60 miles to the Yentna River. Part of the Susitna River drainage, Lake Creek is home to some of the largest King Salmon in the world weighing in at over 50 pounds. Using the right techniques during the peak of the run, Lake Creek will produce 20+ kings per day to the hand.




Don't fillet those Kenai Kings....

Hold off on filleting your Kenai River till you get to shore or away from your shore fishing spot the Alaska Department of Fish and Game says:

Anglers may not fillet, mutilate, remove the head, or otherwise disfigure a Kenai River king salmon in such a manner that would prevent determination of the length of fish. Anglers may fillet king salmon after the fish are offloaded from the vessel or removed from the shoreline fishing site. “Shoreline fishing site” means the point on the shoreline where the fish is hooked and removed from the water, at which time it becomes part of the angler’s bag limit.

This regulation becomes effective at 12:01 a.m. on Monday, May 1, and remains in effect through 11:59 p.m., Friday, July 14, 2006.

Catch and release Kenai River trout must stay in stream

Fishing for rainbow/steelhead trout, including catch-and-release, in the flowing waters of the Kenai River is closed by regulation from May 2 – June 10, to protect spawning fish, according to an Alaska Department of Fish and Game news release.

However, in 2005, many anglers were documented catching and releasing rainbows during this closed period while targeting Dolly Varden. Many of these anglers were removing rainbow trout from the water before releasing them. Prohibiting anglers from removing rainbow trout from the water during the spawning closure may reduce mortality of these incidentally-caught trout during a time period when the spawning fish may be more susceptible to handling mortality.

Wednesday, April 26, 2006

SE Alaska king salmon regs announced

The Alaska Department of Fish and Game is announcing the 2006 sport fishing bag and possession limits for king salmon in Southeast Alaska and Yakutat which will become effective 12:01 A.M. May 1, 2006. The regulations are:

Alaska residents: bag and possession limit of three king salmon 28 inches or greater in length; no annual limit. The use of two rods per angler is allowed from October 2006 through March 2007. Nonresidents: bag and possession limit of two king salmon 28 inches or greater in length in May and one king salmon 28 inches or greater in length for the remainder of the year; an annual limit of four king salmon 28 inches or greater in length for the entire year.

These regulations apply in all marine waters of Southeast Alaska unless otherwise announced. The nonresident annual limit of four king salmon also applies in all freshwaters between Cape Suckling and Cape Fairweather. See the entire news release for more information >>>

Ice houses must be removed by April 30

ADFG is reminding anglers that ice houses must be removed from all water bodies by April 30.

Sunday, April 23, 2006

Hot Threads on the Alaska Fishing Forum

Monday, April 10, 2006

State Sport Fishing Regulations Become Effective 15 April

The new sport fishing regulations for Alaska take effect on April 15. The regulations are available from the Alaska Department of Fish and Game, state license vendors and online.

ADFG Revises Fishing Guide Logbook Program

The Alaska Department of Fish and Game has revised its logbook program for freshwater guides and saltwater charter operators. According to the news release, "both saltwater and freshwater logbook data will need to be submitted to the department weekly. In addition, guides will be required to record the license number, client residency, as well as catch and harvest information for all clients."

The agency also reported that "another change for 2006 is that halibut reporting in the saltwater logbook will be re-instituted. While halibut are a federally managed species, the department is currently exploring options to gain greater oversight and management of the halibut charter industry, an important fishery for Alaskan coastal communities. To that end, the department has committed to collect more accurate effort and harvest data from the halibut charter fleet."

SE Alaska Chinook Quota Down

ADFG reported that the chinook salmon quota for this year will be substantially lower than last year, although the allowable harvest will be well above average. Chinook returns remain strong along west coast rivers, but are below the exceptional levels of 2003 to 2005, the news release reports.

Governor Appoints Fairbanksan to Fish Board

Governor Frank Murkowski has appointed longtime Fairbanksan Bonnie Williams to the Alaska Board of Fisheries.

Williams "was appointed to the Board of Fisheries for a three-year term that begins July 1, 2006. Williams has served on the federal Bureau of Land Management Northern Advisory Council and has been a member of the Fairbanks North Star Borough Assembly, variously chairing Finance, Audit, Pioneer Park and Capital Projects. Her appointment requires legislative confirmation and financial disclosure. Williams replaces Fred Bouse, also of Fairbanks, who did not seek reappointment."

“I was pleased to appoint Bonnie Williams to the Board of Fisheries,” said the governor. “She has a long and distinguished career of public service and I am confident that she will bring that public service ethic with her in her new role as a member of the Board of Fisheries.”

Friday, April 07, 2006

Emergency Marine Communications for Coastal Alaska

What does the small boat operator take with for communications when things go really bad on the water? A US Coast Guard Master Chief tells how it works and what you should do.

The Alaska Outdoor Council -- Advocacy for Alaska Outdoors

AOC executive director Rod Arno (l.) and AOC member Terry Boyles at the AOC booth at the showWe met up with Alaska Outdoor Council Executive Director Rod Arno at the Great Alaska Sportsman's Show on April 7. Arno and I talked in the interview about the council and why Alaskans and others interested in the Alaska out of doors should consider joining the ranks of membership, either through an affiliated club, or as an individual member.

The MatSu Sportsmans show: how did it go?

The MatSu Sportsmans Show registered two firsts this spring: first in the Valley and first of all the outdoors shows in Alaska. Show sponsor Tony Russ (better known as the author of Alaska sheep hunting books) talks about how the show went and plans for next year.

Interview with Halibut.net about info on website

Halibut.net has risen to the top of halibut information websites on the `net, according to webmaster John Beath. In this interview at the Great Alaska Sportsman's Show, Beath tells us what kinds of information you can find that will help you in your quest for halibut....and about his upcoming book.